Getting your emergency plan started

Four steps to get your workplace ready for the unexpected.

1

assess the risks

Every workplace has it's own unique hazards that could led to an unplanned event.

 

Neighbouring facilities such as Service Stations, electrical sub-stations and bushland could pose a risk to your workplace.

Having an understanding of your potenial types of emergencies to occur in your workplace is important to a starting an disaster and emergency management plan.

EMERGENCY CATEGORIES

CODE RED

  • Structure fire

  • Fire alarm activation

  • bush/grass fire

CODE BLUE

CODE PURPLE

  • Bomb threat

  • suspicious item

CODE YELLOW

  • Gas leak

  • Chemical spill

  • Utilities failure

  • Structural collapse

Medical emergency

CODE BLACK

  • Robbery

  • Active shooter

  • Aggressive persons

  • Civil disorder

CODE BROWN

External emergenices

bushfires, floods, storms etc.

CODE ORANGE

Evacuation of facility

Where to evacuate?

When to evacuate?

How to egress safely?

2

create a plan

An emergency management and disaster plan is your organisations guide to an emergency.

a comprehensive plan will detail actions to take during and after an emergency to restore an organisation back to normal operations.

Each facility will need to establish an Emergency Planning Committee (EPC), separate from the WH&S committee. The EPC should be representatives of staff working on that facility, to prepare the organisation though resilience in training and reviewing initial plans by discussions of potential emergencies.

A Emergency Control Organisation (EOC ) for a facility would also need to be estabished and can consist of EPC members. The EOC will need to consist of on-site staff (Wardens) to respond and manage a emergency in conjunction with the emergency services and other responders.

Evacuation diagrams maybe required for your facility. diagrams identify fire & emergency equipment, exit routes, refuge areas and emergency assembly points.

Click here to view our consultancy services.

For equipment & diagrams visit our Online Shop

example of emergency control organisation structure

WARDEN STRUCTURE TABARDS.png
3

train & practice

Routine practice of emergency response skills is import to a resilient emergency management plan within your workplace. Practical and theory training in first attack firefighting, evacuation egress, facility lock downs and post incident recovery processes increases your ability to deal with emergencies.

We recommend initial training to be national recognised training with periodic training scenarios after the initial training to maintain skill sets and address any issues in the practicability of your emergency and disaster plan.

Click here to view our training services.

4

review your plan

Your emergency plan and your response training maybe complete, but maintaining a prepared workplace is ongoing.

Regular meetings with your EPC and EOC and reviewing your emergency plan for new or existing emergencies will strengthen your confidence and ability to handle the worst.

Every workplace is different,

find out whats best for your facility.

Untitled-1.png

© 2018-2020 Djarraba Fire & Emergency Management, Camden South NSW, Australia.

  • White Facebook Icon
  • White LinkedIn Icon
  • White Instagram Icon
  • White Twitter Icon
  • White YouTube Icon
dfemlogo.png
0